James lind essay on diseases

Edinburgh, Scotland, 4 October ; d. Gosport, Hampshire, England, 13 July medicine. The discoverer of citrus fruit as a cure for scurvy, Lind was the son of Margaret Smelum alternately spelled Smellum or Smellome and James Linda substantial Edinburgh merchant. He was promoted to surgeon in

James lind essay on diseases

Who was James Lind? Visitors to the Edinburgh University quadrangle in Teviot Place, which used to house the Medical School, are unlikely to miss the large plaque put up in by the Sunkist Growers of Citrus Fruit in California and Arizona.

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Yet Lind was little known in when an anonymous author of an article entitled Heroes of Medicine: James Lind, which was published in the medical journal The Practitioner, wrote: James Lind has been the means of saving innumerable lives and preventing an incalculable amount of suffering; yet even to the members of his own profession today his name is almost unknown.

Of his life even less is known than that of Shakespeare. The current whereabouts of the original portrait was discovered through the James Lind Library. Writing about Lind poses significant problems. As the article in The Practitioner notes, there is very little primary source material.

No cache of manuscript papers full of telling autobiographical detail has ever been unearthed. Another problem for Lind writers is that the historical waters are muddied by an identically named contemporaneous and successful medical cousin - James Lind —physician to the household of George III.

Arguably the main problem in researching Lind, however, is the way that the man and the scurvy story have been used as an exemplar by writers with their own biases. He was born in Edinburgh on 4 Octoberthe son of an Edinburgh merchant whose wife had medical connections.

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In Lind was apprenticed to George Langlands, an Edinburgh surgeon. Some researchers have wondered why Lind did not formally enrol in Edinburgh University.

Lind is recorded as having attended a course of anatomy lectures in given by one of the doyens of the Edinburgh medical scene, Professor Alexander Monro primus. The ship was captained by the influential George Edgcumbe later first earl of Mount Edgcumbewho went on to become commander-in-chief of the Royal Navy at Plymouth.

In Lind retired from the Navy and returned to Enlightenment Edinburgh, where he set up a medical practice in a competitive field. Lind graduated MD in the University of Edinburgh inchoosing venereal disease as the subject for the required thesis, presumably because of his naval experience.

Later that year, Sir Alexander Dick received another letter from Lind, vividly describing the hospital and precautions against the spread of disease: Haslar is an immense pile of a building.

James Lind | British physician | timberdesignmag.com

It will certainly be the largest hospital in Europe when finished … the hospital is under the direction of a physician and council … [and] … No patient is admitted into the hospital until he is stripped of all his clothes and well washed.

Rodger urges caution in discussing a disease whose name was used by doctors as a catch—all term for anything they could not identify or cure. Containing an inquiry into the nature, causes and cure, of that disease. Together with a critical and chronological view of what has been published on the subject was clearly regarded as an important book.

James lind essay on diseases

He uses the work to wrestle with the contemporary theories of the causes of scurvy, and to put forward his own view - that scurvy is a disease of faulty digestion and excretion, exacerbated by environment. He believed there were multiple causes of scurvy, including diet, foul air and lack of exercise.

There are many interesting things in the book, however.An essay on diseases incidental to Europeans: in hot climates, with the method of preventing their fatal consequences To which is added, an appendix, concerning intermittent fevers; and a simple and easy way to render sea water fresh,and to prevent a scarcity of provisions in long voyages at sea James Lind: Éditeur: Printed by William.

An essay on diseases incidental to Europeans in hot climates: With the method of preventing their fatal consequences. By James Lind To which is added, an appendix concerning intermittent fevers. An essay on diseases incidental to Europeans in hot climates. With the method of preventing their fatal consequences To which is added, an appendix concerning intermittent fevers. by Lind, James, ; London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine; London . An essay on diseases incidental to Europeans: in hot climates, with the method of preventing their fatal consequences To which is added, an appendix, concerning intermittent fevers; and a simple and easy way to render sea water fresh,and to prevent a scarcity of provisions in long voyages at sea.

Lind’s last major work, An Essay on Diseases Incidental to Europeans in Hot Climates (), was written primarily for the use of travelers and emigrants to tropical colonies and remained the standard work on tropical medicine in English for half a century.

LIND, JAMES. James Lind. Jan 04,  · Scurvy by James Lind - Literary Animation about this terrible,but preventable disease of old until James Lind realised the way to prevent it was to stock citrus fruit on ships and ensure the.

He also wrote An Essay on Diseases Incidental to Europeans in Hot Climates (). Learn More in these related Britannica articles: history of medicine: Medicine in the 18th century. James Lind, a British naval surgeon from Edinburgh, recommended fresh fruits and citrus juices to prevent scurvy, a remedy discovered by the Dutch in the 16th.

James lind essay on diseases

An essay on diseases incidental to Europeans in hot climates. With the method of preventing their fatal consequences To which is added, an appendix concerning intermittent fevers.

James Lind | timberdesignmag.com

by Lind, James, ; London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine; London . An essay on diseases incidental to Europeans in hot climates. With the method of preventing their fatal consequences To which is added, an appendix concerning intermittent fevers.

by Lind, James, ; London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine; London .

James Lind - Wikipedia